Critique Partners

critiquingA Good Critique Partner is Platimum and Worth Their Weight In Gold

 

To a writer, a good critique partner is as important as their current WIP(work in progress), their laptop, and just the right pen.  Sometimes it can take several tries to find the right critique partner, and sometimes, like me, you find the right one with your first try.

A good CP (critique partner) knows your voice and doesn’t try to change it, they try to make it stronger and clearer.  They want your work to be the best it can be.  They want you and your work to shine.

To say that this skill is priceless is to lay too small a prize on what a good CP can do for you and your writing.  It is not about telling you each word you write is perfect.  Far from it.  They tell you what is wrong in a way that you can fix it and make it better.  They tell you when you’ve gone off on a tangent that has nothing to do with your story.  They let you know what is confusing and what works. They are another pair of eyes to find the mistakes you’ve skipped over twenty times already.

In the best of worlds your CP becomes your friend too.  Reading each other’s works allows the CP’s to see a piece of the others soul.  Only a friend can do that and still be your friend.

I’ve been gifted with several wonderful CP’s in the time I’ve been seriously pursuing this thing called writing; Lauren Royal, Nancy Phillips, Diana Brandmeyer, Elaine Ecuyer, Lee Lopez, and Judi Soifer. Thanks ladies.
Do you have a critique partner or friend who has changed your life?

Jill James

 

 

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2 thoughts on “Critique Partners

  1. […] Critique Partners As writers, we all reach the point where we need someone else’s opinion. We can ask our friends to read our works and give their feedback, but there is no substitute for the opinions of another writer. The writer can not only point out flaws, he or she can also suggest specific ideas to help fix the flaws. Jill James describes the relationship and what makes it work. For more on critique partners, also read this post describing J.R. Ward’s and Jessica Anderson’s critique relationship. Finally, budding romance writers can find critique partners on the Harlequin website’s writers forums. […]

  2. […] Critique Partners As writers, we all reach the point where we need someone else’s opinion. We can ask our friends to read our works and give their feedback, but there is no substitute for the opinions of another writer. The writer can not only point out flaws, he or she can also suggest specific ideas to help fix the flaws. Jill James describes the relationship and what makes it work. For more on critique partners, also read this post describing J.R. Ward’s and Jessica Anderson’s critique relationship. Finally, budding romance writers can find critique partners on the Harlequin website’s writers forums. […]

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